WORLD TUNN'S

William DREW LOVERING SR

Name
William DREW LOVERING SR
Given names
William DREW
Surname
LOVERING
Name suffix
SR
MarriageMary LANXONView this family
February 14, 1822
Source:

David HOLMAN CFHS 2978 3 Harbour Court North Parade Portscatho TRURO Cornwall TR2 5HH UK

Occupation
Farmer
1839

Immigration 1841
Census 1841 Age: 40 yrs

Occupation
Farmer
1841

Marriage of a childWilliam Drue LOVERINGKatherine HamiltonView this family
December 14, 1850
Address: Garrison Church St. James on the lines in Penetang
Marriage of a childHenry Lanxon LOVERINGMary NOATESView this family
1857

Marriage of a childCharles James Dixon RIPLEYJohanna Margaret LOVERINGView this family
June 23, 1863
Marriage of a childJohn LOVERINGJane Margaret LynchView this family
about 1864

Marriage of a childJohn LOVERINGJane Margaret LynchView this family
about 1864

Marriage of a childEdward Montague Isaacson DURNFORDJane Ann LOVERINGView this family
April 19, 1866
Marriage of a childThomas LOVERINGFlora WOODROWView this family
June 21, 1870
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
father
Marriage: October 3, 1797St Comb Major, Cornwall, England
himself
himself
sister
sister
brother
Family with Mary LANXON - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: February 14, 1822St Enoder
son
son
son
daughter
daughter
son
son
son
son
daughter

MarriageDavid HOLMAN CFHS 2978 3 Harbour Court North Parade Portscatho TRURO Cornwall TR2 5HH UK
Shared note

From Nellis England's genealogy notes: On the Lovering side, William DREW Lovering (1800-1863) was born in St. Colomb County, Cornwall, England. He came to Canada in 1841 on the S.S. John and Mary. This was evidently a long and stormy crossing. His wife's name not known but on the trip to Canada she developed an infectious disease and died the day after arrival in Montreal. It is believed that she is buried in the Montreal Quarantine Cemetery.


From Carol Mercer: DOB 1799

All information from family tree section of Ancestry.com yet to be verified unless otherwise stated. 1861 Census Medonte, Division 1, Page William Lovering- Farmer- England- W.- 61- Male- Widower Jane Lovering- England- W- 32- Female- Single Henry Lovering- England- W- Reside in Matchedash- 26- Male- Married- Non member

The Orillia Packet, Aug. 11, 1898- COLDWATER- The Toronto Star says:- One of the oldest families of Coldwater is the Loverings, who came from England in 1842. Among the family is Mr. H.L. Lovering, who is the best known man in town. Since a boy he has been lumbering, starting as a boat boy. He worked in the first mill on the Georgian Bay, that at Port Severn. He cut the first board ever cut at the head of Lake Superior, near where Duluth now stands. For some years he has owned the grist mill. He has been conected with the Georgian Bay Lumber Co. for the past eighteen years, and is the best known man in the lumber circles on the Georgian Bay. His offices are in the grounds of his handsome residence. For many years he has been a Justice of the Peace, and he is much respected by his townsmen. The senior member of the family is Mr. W.D. Lovering, who tells a romantic tale of his life from the landing at Quebec, the loss of his mother at Montreal, and their long and weary trip over land and water to their forest home. After his father was established on his farm, he started for himself, going to the lumber woods and mills, working for small pay and enduring many hardships. After 1864 he left lumbering and settled on a farm in Matchedash township. He lives retired now in a handsome home in the town, and takes great pride in the home of his youth.

Shared note

THE LOVERING CONTRIBUTION TO THE AREA CHURCHES

The Loverings were primarily Methodist. When the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches amalgamated in 1925 many became members of the United Church of Canada. The following summarizes known involvement with this affiliation as determined from conversations with family members and written documents: • The first North River Sunday School started in the grainery of John and Jane Lovering. This grainery still stands and is part of the barns of Etley Lovering. • The formation of the Sunday School led to a need for a Church. Many of the Loverings contributed greatly in time, energy, and resources to the building of the North River Methodist Church. • William Henry Lovering and his wife Rachael, who lived close to the church, acted as caretakers during the winter months for many years. His daughter Nellie Drue recalls him making shavings and drawing wood to the Church where he and his wife would start the fire while the children dusted the pews, organ and pulpit. • Melvin Victor Lovering carried on a similar function and was at one time an elder. In 1965 the North River Church became part of the Coldwater Congregation. • The "Loverings" are also among the Church Pioneers involved with the founding of the Coldwater United Church and many continued to play an active role in its operation. — In 1910, H.L., John, W.D., and AnDREW Lovering were members o f the Church Board. During this time, a new Church was being built and AnDREW Lovering also served as a member of the Building Committee. — In 1923, the Church was destroyed by fire. AnDREW Lovering, a Board Member, once again became a member of the new Building Committee. — Bruce Lovering and his wife, Donna Crook, were both members of the first Junior Choir. — Mrs. Melvin Lovering is among the list of organ is ts and assistant organists. — H. L. Lovering and Mrs. Walter Lovering held the office of Sunday School Superintendent. — In 1966, Mel V. Lovering was an Honourary Elder and his son Mel V. Lovering was a member of the Committee of Stewards. • Rev. Herbert G. Lovering and Rev. Milton Lovering were both men from the Coldwater area.

Note

WILLIAM DREW LOVERING William Drew married Mary LANXON and they lived in St. Enoder, Cornwall. In the early winter of 1841 they sailed from Padstow, Cornwall on the Ship John and Mary. The day after the family arrived in Montreal Mary died. William continued the journy with his children. They settled first at Eady in Medonte Township, and then lived near Midland, Fesserton and then to the North River in Coldwater. The children settled in Medonte and Matchedash, were there is a place called Lovering Grove. http://connect.ancestry.com/Profile/00311b3d-0002-0000-0000-000000000000

William DREW LOVERING SR

From Nellis England's genealogy notes: On the Lovering side, William DREW Lovering (1800-1863) was born in St. Colomb County, Cornwall, England. He came to Canada in 1841 on the S.S. John and Mary. This was evidently a long and stormy crossing. His wife's name not known but on the trip to Canada she developed an infectious disease and died the day after arrival in Montreal. It is believed that she is buried in the Montreal Quarantine Cemetery.

From Carol Mercer: DOB 1799

All information from family tree section of Ancestry.com yet to be verified unless otherwise stated. 1861 Census Medonte, Division 1, Page William Lovering- Farmer- England- W.- 61- Male- Widower Jane Lovering- England- W- 32- Female- Single Henry Lovering- England- W- Reside in Matchedash- 26- Male- Married- Non member

The Orillia Packet, Aug. 11, 1898- COLDWATER- The Toronto Star says:- One of the oldest families of Coldwater is the Loverings, who came from England in 1842. Among the family is Mr. H.L. Lovering, who is the best known man in town. Since a boy he has been lumbering, starting as a boat boy. He worked in the first mill on the Georgian Bay, that at Port Severn. He cut the first board ever cut at the head of Lake Superior, near where Duluth now stands. For some years he has owned the grist mill. He has been conected with the Georgian Bay Lumber Co. for the past eighteen years, and is the best known man in the lumber circles on the Georgian Bay. His offices are in the grounds of his handsome residence. For many years he has been a Justice of the Peace, and he is much respected by his townsmen. The senior member of the family is Mr. W.D. Lovering, who tells a romantic tale of his life from the landing at Quebec, the loss of his mother at Montreal, and their long and weary trip over land and water to their forest home. After his father was established on his farm, he started for himself, going to the lumber woods and mills, working for small pay and enduring many hardships. After 1864 he left lumbering and settled on a farm in Matchedash township. He lives retired now in a handsome home in the town, and takes great pride in the home of his youth.